Alt.Latino: Louie Vega, Groove service life.

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Alt.Latino: Louie Vega, Groove service life.

The dance floor may be the most egalitarian place on earth. When we start moving our hips and slip our feet, all differences are neutral, the best is surrounded by swinging the body, the shaking body was locked in the same ecstasy. Several generations of public dancing have provided a form of communication for family, friends and even strangers. To some extent, the dance floor has become an almost sacred space… This makes it possible for people who inspire us to appear on the floor of high priests and priestesses.

This week, we spend time with Louis vuitton. He is half of the influential music portfolio Masters At Work. The impact of “small” Louie Vega and his music partner Kenny “Dope” Gonzalez on popular music is inestimable. Since the early 1990s, they have integrated houses, hip-hop, soul, reggae and African Caribbean rhythms, inspiring dancers from all over the world. The duo promoted advanced remix technology to advanced art to inspire their songs, reimagine the rhythm and rhythm, and create new and unexpected things.

Vega is still the power of a dance music, nominated this year as a grammy. His explanation for Loleatta Holloway’s “don’t let you go” list is the best mixed category. I told him about his childhood in the Bronx, his recent cooperation in Cuba, and what we can expect in the future.

The following interview can be heard completely in our latest version of Alt.Latino podcast. For clarity, the transcript below has been edited.

Felix Contreras: Louie Vega, welcome to Alt.Latino. How are you?

Louie Vega: thanks, man. Thank you for your hospitality.

Our interview series is the idea behind an artist’s work, in your case, including a lot of music, but we are selective, because we also want to talk about some of your latest project, including the grammy nominations, so we have a lot of things to talk about. Let’s start with one of my favorite albums, the 1997 Nuyorican Soul album and the album “Habriendo El Dominante” featuring Eddie Palmieri. Tell us some information about this album and the combination of you Latin jazz and your old stuff.

We began to associate with the artists we already had, namely Tito Puente, Eddie Palmieri, La India, Jocelyn Brown and Roy Ayers. You know, for us, it’s about making an album, giving you a little bit of New York City history, and we grew up in New York City. We happen to create a wonderful masterpiece that can stand the test of time, because a lot of people like you now really like it.

Music and social culture blend seamlessly together, consistently. Where did the inspiration come from?

It grew out of the Bronx. You know, for me, it’s like walking through a neighborhood, you hear jazz, you hear Latin music, you hear the Gospel music, you know what? We heard it. And R&B, soul, funk. I thought I was really in trouble when I was a kid, and then when I became a DJ: my record collection, I went to clubs and discos as a kid. I’m just a child in the Bronx dream, I want to listen to everything around – at Madison square garden looking at my uncle Hector, walter (HectorLavoe) when children – all of these things really affected me, you know? He came home in the middle of the night, like 2 a.m., and he saw my mom, and he brought 45 test presses, his huge hits, a few months later. You know, all of this, my sister is a disco queen, and goes to the heaven garage, the attic, and the studio 54 really has a lot to do with me and my DJ world. So I thought, all of these things, and looking at my father, who played the saxophone, the tenor sax for more than fifty years. He was always listening to miles Davis, John coltrane, Charlie parker and all the great people of music, and I would have heard it from a very young age, and heard the voice of fagna. Born in the Bronx street dance, only a block away, see African Bambaataa, Sir Jay, red alert, the African Islam, all of the knight dancer, Rocksteady crews, each person, you know? I think if I was born in any other city, it wouldn’t happen. I blame all this on New York City! And Studio 54 really meant a lot to me and my DJ world. So I thought, all of these things, and looking at my father, who played the saxophone, the tenor sax for more than fifty years. He was always listening to miles Davis, John coltrane, Charlie parker and all the great people of music, and I would have heard it from a very young age, and heard the voice of fagna. Born in the Bronx street dance, only a block away, see African Bambaataa, Sir Jay, red alert, the African Islam, all of the knight dancer, Rocksteady crews, each person, you know? I think if I was born in any other city, it wouldn’t happen. I blame all this on New York City! And Studio 54 really meant a lot to me and my DJ world. So I thought, all of these things, and looking at my father, who played the saxophone, the tenor sax for more than fifty years. He was always listening to miles Davis, John coltrane, Charlie parker and all the great people of music, and I would have heard it from a very young age, and heard the voice of fagna. Born in the Bronx street dance, only a block away, see African Bambaataa, Sir Jay, red alert, the African Islam, all of the knight dancer, Rocksteady crews, each person, you know? I think if I was born in any other city, it wouldn’t happen. I blame all this on New York City! He was always listening to miles Davis, John coltrane, Charlie parker and all the great people of music, and I would have heard it from a very young age, and heard the voice of fagna. Born in the Bronx street dance, only a block away, see African Bambaataa, Sir Jay, red alert, the African Islam, all of the knight dancer, Rocksteady crews, each person, you know? I think if I was born in any other city, it wouldn’t happen. I blame all this on New York City! He was always listening to miles Davis, John coltrane, Charlie parker and all the great people of music, and I would have heard it from a very young age, and heard the voice of fagna. Born in the Bronx street dance, only a block away, see African Bambaataa, Sir Jay, red alert, the African Islam, all of the knight dancer, Rocksteady crews, each person, you know? I think if I was born in any other city, it wouldn’t happen. I blame all this on New York City! You know what? I think if I was born in any other city, it wouldn’t happen. I blame all this on New York City! You know what? I think if I was born in any other city, it wouldn’t happen. I blame all this on New York City!

The music we heard at that time was about the streets, you know, what people were going through and, of course, fun – they were the Kings. This is great, and now the salsa dance of Fania records is reclaiming interest – people want to hear it, young people want to hear it. You know, I met a lot of people in their 20s, in their 20s, and they love HectorLavoe and WillieColon. I mean, a perfect example of this is brother martinez: I work in ibiza island with them, every time I go to the studio, I walk into, I’ll hear Hector, walter (HectorLavoe). I’ll never forget when Fat Joe told me he liked HectorLavoe. Jennifer lopez. And Marc, let’s get started.

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